Apache Shale Web framework project retired

Inactivity noted in closure; founder cites migration of project concepts to other Java effort

The Apache Shale Web application framework project has been retired due to inactivity, according to a bulletin from Apache on Thursday.

Shale was fundamentally based on JavaServer Faces (JSF), a Java technology for building server-side user interfaces. Shale Test code has been forked into the Apache MyFaces projects and list discussion highlighted MyFaces and JBoss Seam as successor projects, the bulletin said.

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Shale concepts have been incorporated into JSF 2.0, said project founder Craig McClanahan on Thursday.

"One of my primary motivations for starting the Apache Shale project in the first place was to add some application level framework capabilities around the JavaServer Faces 1.0 component model," McClanahan said. "I'm quite pleased to see many of the ideas from Shale incorporated into the JavaServer Faces 2.0 standard (recently approved), which makes the need for a separate framework much less important.

Shale had added features to JSF such as alternative templating, annotations and a dialog framework, according to Apache. It was originally intended to be a successor to Apache Struts 1.0, also founded by McClanahan, Apache said. Struts is an open source framework for building servlet and JavaServer Pages-based Web applications based on the Model View Controller design paradigm.

While the Shale user mailing list stays open, the rest of the project's resources will be available in a read-only state. The project actually was moved into the Apache Attic, for end-of'-life projects, in May.

This story, "Apache Shale Web framework project retired" was originally published by InfoWorld.

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