What's the Go language really good for?

Learn the strengths, weaknesses, use cases, and future directions of Google's hit programming language

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During its eight-plus years in the wild, Google’s Go language—with version 1.8.1 out as of April 2017—has evolved from being a curiosity for alpha geeks to being the battle-tested programming language behind some of the world’s most important cloud-centric projects. 

Why was Go chosen by the developers of such projects as Docker and Kubernetes? What are Go’s defining characteristics, how does it differ from other programming languages, and what kinds of projects is it most suitable for building? In this article, we’ll explore Go’s feature set, the optimal use cases, the language’s omissions and limitations, and where Go may be going from here.

Go small and simple

Go, or Golang as it is often called, was developed by Google employees—chiefly longtime Unix guru and Google distinguished engineer Rob Pike—but it’s not strictly speaking a “Google project.” Rather, Go is developed as a community-led open source project, spearheaded by leadership that has strong opinions about how Go should be used and the direction the language should take.

Go is meant to be simple to learn, straightforward to work with, and easy to read by other developers. Go does not have a large feature set, especially when compared to languages like C++. Go is reminiscent of C in its syntax, making it relatively easy for longtime C developers to learn. That said, many features of Go, especially its concurrency and functional programming features, harken back to languages such as Erlang.

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