glassfish is google's

with the acquisition of Sun complete, and Oracle set to announce their roadmap for Sun products and technologies, the one thing i will be looking for is how they justify investment in the set of products that fall under the Glassfish moniker...with WebLogic as the run-time for Fusion, and by extension the ERP apps, and nearly all the database deals that will be bundled with an application server, there is virtually no way Glassfish survives beyond the year, even as Oracle is obliged to keep MySQL alive for the low-end implementations....its a shame, but it makes sense, perhaps Oracle will take the ESB and take some of NetBeans, but there is not a chance they will risk diluting their investment in BEA, by supporting yet another app server, one that only has cache within the Java developer community, and has yet to penetrate the enterprise, even though it probably is a better product-line than WebLogic...the train has left the station, and there is no turning back on Fusion, this far in to the development process, which is already massively behind schedule.... so, what is a Glassfish user to do, other than wait for a fork?....i suggest that as it is the Reference Implementation of Java EE, it would be best served as a project at google, and by that i mean a project living within Google Code, so that an enterprise product could take root at the ad/search giant, and give them a way in to the minds of Java developers worldwide...this is why it makes sense: - Google builds cloud apps, and Glassfish is the best cloud app server on the market... - Java is still the base for Guice and other development efforts at Google, so getting their feet wet with enterprise Java, only further positions Google as a necessary counter-weight to .Net and Microsoft.... - Glassfish is feature complete, and would greatly benefit from the engineering resources at Google to make it more tailored toward consumer facing applications.... - Oracle and google are natural allies, aside from Ellison's public campaign against clouds, they do different things, and do not get in each other's way and they have a common enemy in complexity of IT, which only benefits IBM Global Services and Microsoft's one size-fits-all mentality.... - Google needs an enterprise story, and building a middleware stack from the bottom-up would take too long, and would not be accepted within the marketplace for some time, too long to stay pace with .Net.... so, Oracle should de-emphasize the investment in Glassfish, as they are determined to shake resources out of Sun and make it profitable, and give the code direction to Google to make a viable enterprise platform for the legions of developers that are now circling around Guice, Android, and Chrome, all while giving enterprise Java a needed shot in the arm following the delays of JBoss 6 and the insurgency of SpringSource to fragment component portability.... this would not necessarily be a future threat to Fusion, and would continue to give Oracle some room to bounce ideas off of a well-financed engineering team without the necessary investment in in-house resources....the product managers and engineering talent could easily transfer from Oracle to Google, as they are down the highway from each other, and would give google a lot of talent to work on their enterprise strategy all while supporting open source development, as they have been doing.... this would be a welcome transfer by Red Hat and IBM's calculation, as they do not see Google in their accounts, and Glassfish would merely be tuned to be a fine reference implementation, with future development as the base of all of Google's enterprise development to reach the Java customer base, that is looking for guidance on whether their decade-long investment in enterprise Java is worth continuing....portability would be all but guaranteed with WebSphere, WebLogic, JBoss, and Glassfish all surviving the consolidation of IT, with only an acquisition of Red hat by IBM being absent to provide a true triumvirate to compete with Microsoft via Google, IBM, and Oracle.... sooner rather than later, Google needs to get serious about its intentions within the enterprise, and Glassfish is a natural fit, as an open source platform, that is well ahead on standards and specification compliance, they could continue this leadership while building a number of projects around Glassfish that would help them better compete with Microsoft in accounts that need the enterprise capabilities... it is likely that Oracle will pledge support for Glassfish, while at the same time beginning the process of de-emphasizing investment in its ongoing development, whether that be engineering or marketing or both...Google could bring a bridge from the past development to the future of enterprise Java, and not necessarily segment SpringSource out of the equation, as Spring runs on Glassfish, all the pieces are in place, just need to get it done....