JavaWorld News Briefs (2/1/97)

Keeping you abreast of the ever-changing Java world

Headlines

Apple plans to retool OpenDoc for Java

ATG adds to its Java-based Dynamo suite

Brokerage firm creates a need for in-house Java programmers

Corel tries to grab Microsoft share

Create and deploy Java databases with Fresco

DTAI's JustDBC delivers robust intranet database connectivity

Early code shows Corel's Office for Java has promise on NCs

IBM, JavaSoft, Netscape, and Novell take Java on a world tour

IBM's NC group helps corps build enterprise-wide Java apps

Internet Explorer gets more Java support

Lotus aims to make Domino Java friendly

Microsoft releases cross-platform Java libraries

Netscape and Microsoft work to plug up browser security holes

Novell incorporates DeveloperNet track into BrainShare 97

Prentice Hall's newest Web-based titles

Publish Java applets on Castanet channels

Sun and OpenVision team up to deliver storage-management solutions for large servers

Sun facilitates Java use for public network operators

Tools from Check Point and TIS protect against criminal Java/ActiveX objects

VeriSign will use Finjan's applet scanner

Web Integrity helps manage corporate Web objects

Whose vision on the industry should you follow?

Microsoft releases cross-platform Java libraries

Microsoft released a set of cross-platform Java class libraries, called the Application Foundation Classes (AFC), that should run on any platform that supports the Java virtual machine (JVM). Along with the new libraries, Microsoft unveiled details on planned enhancements to its Win32 JVM. The plans include beefed-up support for the Unicode international standard, as well as support for a new capabilities and security model that will enable Java applets to access systems resources.

Microsoft indicated that it will also support JavaBean components, in addition to the language and virtual machine enhancements expected in the JDK 1.1. The new virtual machine capabilities will be added to the Internet Explorer 4.0 beta, which is expected later in February.

The first three AFC libraries, slated to be released with the upcoming Internet Explorer 4.0 beta, are designed to provide developers with a better Java user interface, graphics, and multimedia capabilities. According to Microsoft officials, none of the class libraries conflict with JavaSoft's classes; in fact, they are built using items such as the Abstract Windowing Toolkit that comes with the JDK. The AFC can be freely distributed and licensed by third-party developers.

http://www.microsoft.com/ie/default.asp

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Internet Explorer gets more Java support

This month, Microsoft upgraded Internet Explorer 3.0 for Windows 3.1 and Windows NT 3.51 by adding support for the Java virtual machine (JVM). The beta version of the JVM for the two operating systems has been posted to Microsoft's Web site.

For the 16-bit Windows 3.1, the JVM includes a "thread package" that enables it to run threaded Java applets. Both versions include an autoproxy support feature, allowing corporations to automatically set proxy servers for internal users.

http://www.microsoft.com/ie/default.asp

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Sun facilitates Java use for public network operators

Sun Microsystems' Java Telecom Object Network (JTONE) is a forum of 20 telephone companies and Internet Service Providers formed to allow public network operators an easy way to use Java in their services. Sun will provide the JTONE members with applets that can be downloaded over the Web and can be used as the basic building blocks on which to create Java-based network services.

Bell Atlantic will be among the first to demonstrate a Java-based customer management application.

This forum is similar to the Sun's Java Financial Object Exchange, or JFOX, which it announced for the financial industry in October.

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IBM, JavaSoft, Netscape, and Novell take Java on a world tour

Organized by IBM, Netscape, and Sun's JavaSoft division, the one-day Java Education World Tour '97 -- starting in various cities on the west coast on February 21 -- is a series of educational seminars for commercial developers around the world. It will focus on the benefits of Java technology and how Java can help software developers be more successful.

The keynote will feature John M. Thompson, senior VP of IBM Software, Jim Barksdale, Netscape's CEO, and Scott McNealy, Sun Microsystem's CEO. They will speak about their "100% Commitment to 100% Java." Registration will begin at 7:00 am. The sessions are as follows:

The cost of the conference (North American Tour) is 9 if you register at least five working days prior to the event, and 49 for on-site registration. Participants will receive instructional and Java tools CD-ROMs free with registration.

http://javaworldtour.sbexpos.com

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VeriSign will use Finjan's applet scanner

VeriSign, a leading Internet certification authority, has endorsed Finjan's SurfinGate proprietary Java applet scanning technology. The two companies plan to incorporate VeriSign's Digital IDs into SurfinGate.

According to a recent InfoWorld survey, one out of every three Web sites is Java-enabled and more than 20 million people are using Java-enabled browsers. That's a lot of people and sites that can be stopped cold by a bad Java applet. The Finjan SurfinGate technology enhances security by thoroughly scanning applets for potential security threats. This technology can be combined with VeriSign's Digital IDs to further enhance security. VeriSign acts as a trusted third party that authenticates, issues, and manages Digital IDs for consumers and businesses interacting over the Web.

Finjan Software: http://www.finjan.com/products.html

VeriSign: http://www.verisign.com/products/index.html

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Novell incorporates DeveloperNet track into BrainShare 97

The Novell-sponsored BrainShare 97 technical conference, slated for March 24 to 28 in Salt Lake City, has a new sessions track dedicated to Novell's DeveloperNet program. DeveloperNet provides software developers with the tools and knowledge they need to create next-generation network application software: Java-based Internet/intranet applications and directory-enabled applications.

The DeveloperNet track will offer code-break sessions, providing developers with a hands-on opportunity to explore and develop sample code with Novell's experts. In addition, BrainShare 97 will include keynote speeches from Novell executives and other industry leaders, including Java visionary James Gosling.

The new track provides in-depth technical sessions on building applications and hardware solutions that leverage Novell's advanced networking services, including Novell Directory Services (NDS). The track focuses on such topics as directory-enabled applications; comparisons of several network directory-access application programming interfaces, including NDS, LDAP, X.500, ODSI, HTTP, MAPI; an NDS architecture overview; and enabling existing applications to operate on the Internet.

Session list: http://brainshare.novell.com/97/sessionslist.html

Registration: http://brainshare.novell.com/

DeveloperNet: http://developer.novell.com/

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Sun and OpenVision team up to deliver

storage-management solutions for large servers

Sun and OpenVision Technologies have joined forces to provide a new family of enterprise-class storage-management products for the high-end data center. Sun's Enterprise NetBackup and Enterprise HSM data-management software are Web-based versions of OpenVision's AXXiON software. When integrated with the Java-based Sun Enterprise Storage Manager and enterprise tape libraries, Enterprise NetBackup and Enterprise HSM create a seamless, integrated storage-management solution that allows all storage-management functions to be handled through a single console.

OpenVision will incorporate Java Management APIs into its NetBackup and HSM software, so backup can be initiated from either the server or a client over either the Internet or a company's intranet. The Java-enabled software will be available only through Sun for use with the Sun Ultra Enterprise servers, and will be marketed to large database, data warehousing, and enterprise client/server application users.

Products should start shipping in Q297. Pricing is not yet available.

Sun: http://www.sun.com/datacenter/products/storage_sols.html

OpenVision: http://www.ov.com/product/storage.html

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Web Integrity helps manage corporate Web objects

Mortice Kern Systems' (MKS) Web Integrity 2.1, an easy-to-use, Web-object management system designed for business users, brings software configuration management to the Web by balancing the corporate IT's need for centralized control of the intranet with the business workgroups' need for flexibility in developing and managing all forms of Web objects, including HTML, spreadsheets, video, sound, graphics, and software such as Java apps. Web Integrity combines a thin Java-enabled browser client with robust software configuration management functionality on the Web server.

With Web Integrity, IT managers can keep a complete history of the intranet by tracking all changes to all Web objects. In addition, IT can institute centralized processes for automating corporate intranet standards such as layout verification, spell checking, and link checking, without affecting user autonomy and flexibility. Web Integrity's open architecture supports leading Web servers and tools while allowing for customization.

Web Integrity is now available direct from MKS. Web Integrity's server engine, which can be licensed for 5,000, is available for Netscape FastTrack Server, Netscape Enterprise Server, and Microsoft Internet Information Server. Platforms supported include Windows NT, Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, and Irix. Web Integrity's Java interface runs on all Java-supported platforms.

Netscape ships a component of MKS's Web-object management solution, called MKS Integrity Engine, with every copy of its Netscape Enterprise Server.

http://www.mks.com/solution/ie/

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IBM's NC group helps corps build enterprise-wide Java apps

IBM's newly formed Network Computing Projects (NCP) group held its first briefings to disclose its agenda for helping corporate accounts build Java-based applications that span the enterprise. The group, which is funded by IBM's Personal Software Products (PSP) division, will have the right to offer the applications it develops in concert with users to any other IBM division. However, the new group will not be selling any products directly to users.