How to get started with server-side Java

Take advantage of the platform-independent, object-oriented power of Netscape's server-side applets. An introduction.

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Including your own classes

The classpath for server-side applets is stored in the Netscape server's obj.conf file, available in the admserv directory under your server root. If you want to use classes that aren't found in serv2_0.zip (such as JDBC driver classes), you will have to edit the obj.conf file. On Unix, this probably will require root access. In the obj.conf file, there is a line that says classpath=/usr/ns-home/plugins/java/classes/serv2_0.zip. The full path of any foreign classes should be appended to this line. Then, to apply your changes, in the Server Manager click on Apply in the upper right-hand corner. And, as always, you'll need to stop and start the server before these changes will take effect.

Next time

Server-side Java is a powerful new technology but one that needs a well-documented standard. This article should help you get started using SSJ with the Netscape servers. In future months I will expand on this base to discuss in more detail the netscape.server.applet classes, how to return multipart responses, tricks for accessing databases, and synchronization issues.

Jason Hunter works in software testing at Silicon Graphics Inc., where he breaks all sorts of pre-release Web technologies. He has jumped on the Java bandwagon and is busy using it to aid in automated testing across multiple platforms. If by some miracle you don't find him at work, he's probably out hiking in the mountains.

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