Jenkins CI/CD is in trouble, so its founder wants to split it up

The autonomous nature of the Jenkins community has made it unable to solve some issues, which are becoming more pronounced with the project now more than ten years old

Become An Insider

Sign up now and get FREE access to hundreds of Insider articles, guides, reviews, interviews, blogs, and other premium content. Learn more.

Jenkins, the popular open source CI/CD system, has reached a crossroads, with founder Kohsuke Kawaguchi looking to tackle issues—including instability and configuration problems—that have caused the platform to lose appeal.

The autonomous nature of the Jenkins community has made it unable to solve some issues, which are becoming more pronounced with the project now more than ten years old, Kawaguchi said in a bulletin.

Under Kawaguchi’s plan, the platform’s growing pains will be tackled through a two-pronged development vision:

  • Cloud Native Jenkins, a general-purpose CI/CD engine that runs on Kubernetes, embracing a fundamentally different architecture architecture and extensibility mechanism.
  • Jolt in Jenkins, which continues the incremental trajectory of the Jenkins 2 upgrade but with users able to gain what is really needed, such as a faster pace of development and improved stability.

What’s wrong with Jenkins

To continue reading this article register now