Matt Asay

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem at Adobe at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source, Asay has served as VP of community at MongoDB; VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and earned his juris doctorate at Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, and his MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury and his BA from Brigham Young University. Asay was one of InfoWorld's first bloggers.

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

Apache Kafka continues its ascent as attention shifts from lumbering Hadoop and data lakes to real-time streams

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

What if Google finds a more efficient way to drive paying customers to its cloud?

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

You'd think the advent of 'webscale' NoSQL databases would have consigned MySQL to history. But you'd be very wrong

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

The Open Container Project wants to standardize Docker the old-fashioned way: by committee. The pushback from Docker delivers a compelling counterpoint

Your fear of open source lock-in is ridiculous

Your fear of open source lock-in is ridiculous

Lock-in is the nature of software, and open source is just software

CIOs still don't get open source

CIOs still don't get open source

CIOs are clueless about open source in 2016? So it appears, according to a fresh Forrester report

The secrets to LinkedIn's open source success

The secrets to LinkedIn's open source success

Highly useful LinkedIn projects like Kafka, Samza, Helix, and Voldemort have gained broad adoption -- and LinkedIn engineers have benefited from the experience

Docker, not production-ready? Not so, says Docker

Docker, not production-ready? Not so, says Docker

Docker has taken dev-and-test by storm, but production deployments have awaited more mature security and management. Some customers, however, aren’t so patient

Why developers should be allowed to roam free

Why developers should be allowed to roam free

As developer influence grows, enterprises that use -- and companies that sell -- software must remove as many constraints on coders as possible

 Red Hat is boring -- and more open source companies should emulate it

Red Hat is boring -- and more open source companies should emulate it

Brick by brick, Red Hat has built itself into a powerhouse without raising piles of VC money. Today's open source upstarts could learn from it

Two reasons the Rust language will succeed

Two reasons the Rust language will succeed

Rust's developer community has created a culture of collaboration that could help propel the language's success.

Enterprises still miss the real point of open source

Enterprises still miss the real point of open source

Developers want to work for open-source-savvy enterprises. Here's why enterprise IT is still a long way from the mark.

Is AngularJS ready for the enterprise?

Is AngularJS ready for the enterprise?

AngularJS's habit of breaking backward compatibility as it rushes to the future could be a deal breaker for enterprises accustomed to 10-year support guarantees. Or not.

ARM's Mbed falls short of true open source

ARM's Mbed falls short of true open source

Mbed promises to resolve some of IoT's biggest challenges, but its resemblance to Android in open source strategy won't win the OS major converts.

How Red Hat can catch the developer train

How Red Hat can catch the developer train

Red Hat's technology is still top-notch, especially for mission-critical workloads. But the open source leader lacks meaningful partnerships.

How to crack an open source community
Tip

How to crack an open source community

Want to contribute to an open source project? Here are the main reasons you'll struggle -- and some tips to help you persevere.

Fresh attacks on open source miss the mark

Fresh attacks on open source miss the mark

Critics pine for the good old days of proprietary software, but open source is entrenched and flourishing.

The truth about big data: It's more than technology

The truth about big data: It's more than technology

Big data is a maddeningly broad concept, in part because it represents a new, iterative approach to solving problems.

We're living in a post-open source world

We're living in a post-open source world

A new generation of developers wants little to do with the complexities of open source licensing -- and they may be on to something, whether the open source forebears like it or not.

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