Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay is a Principal at Amazon Web Services. Formerly, Asay was Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing, and community at MongoDB; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues.

Why the Rust language is on the rise

Why the Rust language is on the rise

Rust may not be easy to learn, but developers love the speed, the tools, the ‘guard rails,‘ and the community

Move aside, RDBMS, NoSQL owns the future

Move aside, RDBMS, NoSQL owns the future

Relational databases may keep ‘old stack’ workloads, but research suggests NoSQL databases will dominate ‘new stack’ spending

Should open source licenses fight evil?

Should open source licenses fight evil?

New open source licenses attempt to legislate what we can and cannot do with software. Problem is, that’s not open

Is Java the next COBOL?

Is Java the next COBOL?

60 years later, billions of lines of COBOL live on. Could Java, SQL, or Python last as long?

Open source has never been stronger

Open source has never been stronger

With cloud companies open-sourcing their innovations, and enterprises increasing participation, open source sustainability is at an all-time high

Hadoop runs out of gas

Hadoop runs out of gas

As big data customers flee complexity and embrace the cloud, Hadoop vendors are sputtering

For open source vs. proprietary, AWS might have it both ways

For open source vs. proprietary, AWS might have it both ways

Google profits from projects like TensorFlow and Kubernetes, but AWS profits more

Oracle’s and IBM’s hybrid cloud defense may not hold

Oracle’s and IBM’s hybrid cloud defense may not hold

The future may be in the public cloud, but AWS, Microsoft, and Google are collecting all the on-premises cash they can along the way

Why Oracle is happy to lose to AWS and MongoDB

Why Oracle is happy to lose to AWS and MongoDB

Open source and cloud developers lead the charge away from Oracle’s database, but they're not where Oracle makes its money

Programming languages are now driven by corporations: Should we be worried?

Programming languages are now driven by corporations: Should we be worried?

Today, seemingly the only way a new programming language hits the big time is with the generous backing of a megacorp

Open source licenses may not matter so much any more

Open source licenses may not matter so much any more

The Open Source Initiative won't endorse SSPL, but MongoDB is going forward anyway

The ugly truth about cloud computing in the enterprise

The ugly truth about cloud computing in the enterprise

Enterprise cloud governance is a mess as clouds become the new IT siloes, a sprawl disguised under the “multicloud” or “hybrid cloud” label

Kubernetes is so hard—but worth the pain

Kubernetes is so hard—but worth the pain

2019 will be a challenging year for some enterprises as they try to turn Kubernetes hype into production reality

Why Google Cloud’s new boss will fail like the old boss

Why Google Cloud’s new boss will fail like the old boss

Google's culture doesn’t care about enterprise, and replacing one seasoned enterprise exec with another won’t change that

Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters

Sorry, Linux. Kubernetes is now the OS that matters

Tech industry giants like IBM are investing in the next operating system, and it’s called Kubernetes

What IBM-Red Hat means to the cloud and developers

What IBM-Red Hat means to the cloud and developers

By buying Red Hat, IBM just bought itself a clue in hybrid cloud computing. And it just might work

Machine learning: How to go from theory to reality

Machine learning: How to go from theory to reality

A lack of skilled people continues to stymie the AI revolution. That’s why smart companies invest as much in cultural change as technology adoption—and Google shows how

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

Business can’t win without developers, but you need more

A surprising survey shows that lack of software development capabilities is the top inhibitor to business success. So, how do you fix that?

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

Why there are no shortcuts to machine learning

As long as companies understand that good data science takes time in an enterprise, and give these people room to learn and grow, they won’t need shortcuts

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

When it comes to databases, why ‘I can’t quit you, baby’

Leaving legacy RDMSs is hard, but eventually enterprises will break free of Oracle’s and others’ last grip on their data infrastructure

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