Matt Asay

Matt Asay is Head of Developer Ecosystem at Adobe at Adobe. With more than a decade in open source, Asay has served as VP of community at MongoDB; VP of business development at mobile HTML5 startup Strobe (now part of Facebook); chief operating officer at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; GM, Americas and VP of business development at Alfresco; and part of the team that helped put Novell on its open source track. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and earned his juris doctorate at Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues, and his MA from the University of Kent at Canterbury and his BA from Brigham Young University. Asay was one of InfoWorld's first bloggers.

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Container technologies like Docker are very powerful, but require talent you can’t get. Serverless computing provides the same benefits—with talent you can actually get

Who really contributes to open source

Who really contributes to open source

New data debunks several myths around which companies lead in open source contributions

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

Most code remains closed and proprietary, even though open source now dominates enterprise platforms. How can that be?

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google’s biggest strength is helping enterprises “run like Google”—something that even old-school companies have discovered they can now do

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Postgres is old as dirt, yet over the past five years it has panned out as pure gold

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

AWS, Microsoft, and Google are all racing to figure out how to turn their innovations into open source on-ramps to their proprietary services

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Open source usage has skyrocketed, but not the number of developers working on projects. Those who benefit need to pay developers to keep it all going

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Unless Google can get its serverless act together, it may end up winning the container battle but losing the cloud war

How to get started with machine learning

How to get started with machine learning

Machine learning isn’t something you buy but something you do. Use TensorFlow to experiment now with machine learning so you can build it into your DNA

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

Apache Kafka continues its ascent as attention shifts from lumbering Hadoop and data lakes to real-time streams

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

What if Google finds a more efficient way to drive paying customers to its cloud?

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

You'd think the advent of 'webscale' NoSQL databases would have consigned MySQL to history. But you'd be very wrong

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

The Open Container Project wants to standardize Docker the old-fashioned way: by committee. The pushback from Docker delivers a compelling counterpoint

Your fear of open source lock-in is ridiculous

Your fear of open source lock-in is ridiculous

Lock-in is the nature of software, and open source is just software

CIOs still don't get open source

CIOs still don't get open source

CIOs are clueless about open source in 2016? So it appears, according to a fresh Forrester report

The secrets to LinkedIn's open source success

The secrets to LinkedIn's open source success

Highly useful LinkedIn projects like Kafka, Samza, Helix, and Voldemort have gained broad adoption -- and LinkedIn engineers have benefited from the experience

Docker, not production-ready? Not so, says Docker

Docker, not production-ready? Not so, says Docker

Docker has taken dev-and-test by storm, but production deployments have awaited more mature security and management. Some customers, however, aren’t so patient

Why developers should be allowed to roam free

Why developers should be allowed to roam free

As developer influence grows, enterprises that use -- and companies that sell -- software must remove as many constraints on coders as possible

 Red Hat is boring -- and more open source companies should emulate it

Red Hat is boring -- and more open source companies should emulate it

Brick by brick, Red Hat has built itself into a powerhouse without raising piles of VC money. Today's open source upstarts could learn from it

Two reasons the Rust language will succeed

Two reasons the Rust language will succeed

Rust's developer community has created a culture of collaboration that could help propel the language's success.

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