Matt Asay

Contributor

Matt Asay is a Principal at Amazon Web Services. Formerly, Asay was Head of Developer Ecosystem for Adobe. Prior to Adobe, Asay held a range of roles at open source companies: VP of business development, marketing, and community at MongoDB; VP of business development at real-time analytics company Nodeable (acquired by Appcelerator); VP of business development and interim CEO at mobile HTML5 start-up Strobe (acquired by Facebook); COO at Canonical, the Ubuntu Linux company; and head of the Americas at Alfresco, a content management startup. Asay is an emeritus board member of the Open Source Initiative (OSI) and holds a J.D. from Stanford, where he focused on open source and other IP licensing issues.

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Software security: There’s more to it than bug-bounty programs

Take full advantage of white-hat hackers to help you secure your code. And still do all the other security stuff you should do before you release your code

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

Database shift: Start with open source but finish with AWS

AWS seems to be building natural bridges between on-premises databases like MySQL and cloud services like Amazon Aurora

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Open source’s existential dilemma: the meaning of ‘free'

Developers once were quick to distinguish open source as “free as in freedom, not free as in beer.” Today, as GitHub shows, they demand the beer but are nonchalant about the freedom

The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point

The Kubernetes ‘fork’: Open source purists miss the point

Is Red Hat’s OpenShift a fork of Kubernetes? No, but it still shouldn’t matter if it were

The era of the cloud database has finally begun

The era of the cloud database has finally begun

Enterprises are waking up to discover that their database needs have changed dramatically—and that the old-school RDBMS is no longer the best tool

Database decisions: AWS has changed the game for IT

Database decisions: AWS has changed the game for IT

Enterprises are figuring out that they likely need different database engines to power different parts of their applications. AWS has figured that out, too

Open source isn’t the community you think it is

Open source isn’t the community you think it is

The irony is that what makes open source work—and differ from commercial software—is that only a few developers do the major work on any project

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Skip containers and do serverless computing instead

Container technologies like Docker are very powerful, but require talent you can’t get. Serverless computing provides the same benefits—with talent you can actually get

Who really contributes to open source

Who really contributes to open source

New data debunks several myths around which companies lead in open source contributions

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

20 years on, open source hasn’t changed the world as promised

Most code remains closed and proprietary, even though open source now dominates enterprise platforms. How can that be?

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google Cloud Platform’s secret sauce: Its time is now

Google’s biggest strength is helping enterprises “run like Google”—something that even old-school companies have discovered they can now do

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Why old-school PostgreSQL is so hip again

Postgres is old as dirt, yet over the past five years it has panned out as pure gold

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

Open source innovation is now all about vendor on-ramps

AWS, Microsoft, and Google are all racing to figure out how to turn their innovations into open source on-ramps to their proprietary services

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Blockchain shows open source’s fatal flaw—and a way forward

Open source usage has skyrocketed, but not the number of developers working on projects. Those who benefit need to pay developers to keep it all going

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Serverless computing may kill Google Cloud Platform

Unless Google can get its serverless act together, it may end up winning the container battle but losing the cloud war

How to get started with machine learning

How to get started with machine learning

Machine learning isn’t something you buy but something you do. Use TensorFlow to experiment now with machine learning so you can build it into your DNA

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

All your streaming data are belong to Kafka

Apache Kafka continues its ascent as attention shifts from lumbering Hadoop and data lakes to real-time streams

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

Kubernetes's days may be numbered as open source changes

What if Google finds a more efficient way to drive paying customers to its cloud?

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

You'd think the advent of 'webscale' NoSQL databases would have consigned MySQL to history. But you'd be very wrong

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

Save the whale: Docker rightfully shuns standardization

The Open Container Project wants to standardize Docker the old-fashioned way: by committee. The pushback from Docker delivers a compelling counterpoint

Load More